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8 March 2012 / leggypeggy

Enjoy the Cascade in Yerevan

Yerevan's Cascade

Armenia and Yerevan, its capital, were amazing bonus stops on our London to Sydney jaunt. Armenia wasn’t even on our original itinerary, but good roads in Turkey put us a few days ahead of schedule, so we swung through this welcoming and fascinating country.

The Cascade is one of Yerevan’s gems. Built—at least started—in the 1970s, the Cascade sweeps about seven or eight stories up a steep hill in the city. You can walk up the outdoor stairs or glide up the indoor escalators. The day we visited was a scorcher, so we rode instead of walking—most unusual for Poor John and me.  But it was worth it. Plenty of contemporary artworks grace the sides of the many banks of escalators (I wish I had counted exactly how many levels there are).

A Cascade sculpture

There are more artworks at the top and still more in the gardens at the front of the Cascade. I should admit that there are also lovely artworks, landings and fountains on the outside staircases. After all, the name Cascade refers to the water that tumbles down the sides.

The views from the top are great too. You can see the gardens below, much of the city and, on clear days, Mount Ararat in the distance. Of course, coming and going, you have to run the gauntlet of souvenir shops, but the salespeople aren’t overly insistent.

All in all, I’d say Armenia is worth another visit.

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10 Comments

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  1. Louise M Oliver / Mar 8 2012 3:54 pm

    Very beautiful indeed Peggy.

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  2. Dillard R Griffith M.D. / Mar 4 2013 12:59 pm

    Kearney people: I have a question and a dream? I know the Ancient Silk Route goes through “Ancient Parthia” and was ruled for 1000 years by the descendants of Israel. (Ten Lost Tribes). I would like to go on a search for descendants of these people. I believe all Caucasians are related to many of them. Please weigh in on this and make recommendations. Thank you
    Dillard and Reva Griffith Premed Kearney 1957-58.

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    • leggypeggy / Mar 4 2013 5:12 pm

      Good luck with your search Dillard. I wouldn’t even know where to begin.

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  3. Brian Lageose / Jun 14 2016 1:53 pm

    This looks like a great use of space, and I must admit to an initial odd attraction to the tongue-and-lips artwork in one of the photos. We ran across something similar in Montmartre, but I think I like this one better…

    Liked by 1 person

    • leggypeggy / Jun 14 2016 3:43 pm

      The tongue and lips art is actually a chair; so is the hand. In fact, most of the artworks on the internal stairs were chairs.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Brian Lageose / Jun 14 2016 4:02 pm

    The similar piece that I lusted after in Montmartre was actually a couch, with a more subtle tongue peeking out, like the sliver of tongue a cat shows when they are staring at you and contemplating the various ways they could possibly torment you with their next action… 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  5. jeanleesworld / Jul 9 2016 10:10 am

    This is amazing stuff! Not all art museums allow photography, but I’m thrilled this one did. How else are those of us who can’t reach Armenia see it for ourselves?
    Why, through lovely traveling souls such as yourself and Poor John! 🙂

    Brilliant work with words and camera alike, Peggy. xxxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • leggypeggy / Jul 9 2016 7:29 pm

      Thanks so much Jean. We had a lovely time in Yerevan. Plus I’m pleased to report that our National Art Gallery has just recently allowed photography inside and you can bet I’ll be doing a post on that soon. 🙂

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